Doppler-Wilmot Rating System 1999

This is the only known college football rating system to rank teams by combining the Doppler effect with the Wilmot Proviso, thus achieving maximum proportionate reciprocal capability. The Doppler effect is a law in physics discovered by Christian Doppler, who lived from 1803 to 1853. The Wilmot Proviso was proposed by David Wilmot, who lived from 1814 to 1868. Their meeting in 1851 was the foundation of this system. Used within the context of this rating system, the term national champion of college football in any given season signifies the school with the greatest analytic ratio of logarithmic differential superiority. Thus by integrating Newton's Principia with Einstein's unified field theory and rating the teams on the resulting duodecimal system (epsilon zero) we find the teams in this order for the 1999 season:

 1 Marshall, 13-0................................17.48
 2 Florida State, 12-0...........................17.41
 3 Virginia Tech, 11-1...........................17.34
 4 Nebraska, 12-1................................16.64
 5 Wisconsin, 10-2...............................15.89
 6 Michigan State, 10-2..........................15.22
 7 Kansas State, 11-1............................15.16
 8 Michigan, 10-2................................15.01
 9 Oregon, 9-3...................................14.86
10 Penn State, 10-3..............................14.46
11 Tennessee, 9-3................................13.78
12 Alabama, 10-3.................................12.91
13 Mississippi State, 10-2.......................12.13
14 Florida, 9-4..................................11.23
15 Miami FL, 9-4.................................11.10
16 Southern Mississippi, 9-3.....................10.63
17 Illinois, 8-4.................................10.56
18 Louisiana Tech, 8-3...........................10.07
19 Minnesota, 8-4................................ 9.40
20 Arkansas, 8-4................................. 8.61

The above makes as much sense as the technical jargon snow job that accompanies the ratings of many math formula rating systems. The supercilious explanation above, combined with a chart of random numbers, can produce any desired result. How do we know if these rating systems are legitimate or objective?